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Dictionary of Vexillology: S (Shades of Tincture - Shoulder Patch)

Last modified: 2015-02-28 by rob raeside
Keywords: vexillological terms |
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SHADES OF TINCTURE
See Appendix III.

tincture tincture tincture tincture
From left: Gules and Murrey; Azure and Bleu Celeste


SHAFT
1) See ‘shafted’ below.
2) A term that is sometimes used in place of lance or staff, particularly when a cavalry guidon is being carried – but see ‘lance’ and ‘staff 2)’ (also ‘guidon’).
SHAFTED
A heraldic term used when the wooden section of an arrow, lance or spear is of a different tincture to its head (and/or flights if appropriate) – but see ‘barbed’, (also ‘garnished’, ‘hafted’, ‘hilted’, ‘rogacina’ and ‘tincture’)

flag - Strelice, Czech Republic arms - Strelice, Czech Republic flag - Pracejovice, Czech Republic arms - Pracejovice, Czech Republic
Flag and Arms of Strelice, Czech Republic; Flag and Arms of Pracejovice, Czech Republic


SHAHADA
A term (meaning “testimony” or “approval” in Arabic) that refers to the Islamic statement of faith which appears on several Arab flags, and is usually seen thereon in its shortened form - La allah illa Allah (wa) Muhammed rasulu Allah – or “There is no Deity but God (and) Muhammed is God’s messenger” (see also ‘takbir’and ‘zulfikar’).

Saudi Arabia Asiri Regional Movement, Saudi Arabia Palestinian political flag
National Flag of Saudi Arabia (Graham Bartram); Flag of the Asiri Regional Movement, Saudi Arabia (fotw); A Political Flag from Palestine (fotw)

Notes
a)
The full term reads Ashhadu Alla Ilaha Illa Allah Wa Ashhadu Anna Muhammad Rasulu Allah or "I bear witness that there is no Deity other than Allah and that Muhammad is his servant and Messenger".
b) The use of a sacred text on the Saudi flag has resulted in many restrictions as to its use and appearance.


SHAMROCK
See ‘trefoil’.

Royal North of Ireland Yacht Club ensign
Ensign of the Royal North of Ireland Yacht Club (Clay Moss)


SHARIFIAN FLAG
An alternative term of the Arab Revolt Flag of 1917 – but see ‘pam-Arab colours’ and the note below.

Arab Revolt Flag
Sharifian/Arab Revolt Flag 1917-20

Please note that the name derives specifically from the title of Hussein bin Ali, who as Sharif of Mecca was leader of the Arab Revolt


SHARK ALERT (or ALARM) FLAG (or PENNANT)
See ‘beach flag’.

shark alert flag - Hong Kong shark alert flag - Hong Kong shark alert flag - Australia
Shark Alert Flags, Hong Kong (fotw), South Africa (fotw) and Australia (CS)

Please note that the Australian shark alert warning is the same as Flag Uniform in the International Code of Signals where the meaning is 'you are running into danger'.


SHARK'S TEETH
See ‘wolfteeth’).

shark's teeth shark's teeth
Flag and Arms of Borovnice, Czech Republic (fotw)


SHEAF OF WHEAT
See ‘garbe’).

sheaf of wheat
Flag of Sussex County, Delaware, US (fotw)


SHEAVED BLOCK
A nautical term for a pulley, the sheave being the revolving grooved wheel within the block and on which the halyard runs (see also ‘Appendix I’ and ‘halyard’).

SHELL
See ‘escallop’.

shell
Flag of Sant Jaume dels Domenys, Spain (fotw)


SHERIFF'S BANNER
In English and Welsh Usage, a term for the armorial trumpet banner (or banners) used at the ceremonial installation of a county’s High Sheriff, and usually bearing his personal arms or those of his bailiwick – but see ‘bannerette’ (also ‘armigerous’ and ‘coat of arms 1)’.

Please note that in British Usage (including Scotland) a High Sheriff is now appointed as representing the monarch in all matters relating to the judiciary and to law and order.


SHIELD
1) In heraldry the shield (varying in detail and based on an item of defensive armour) is the basic element of all armorial bearings, and forms the field upon which the main heraldic charges are displayed. It is always blazoned first, and is often shown alone – an escutcheon (see also ‘Appendix IV’, ‘armorial bearings’, ‘banner of arms’, ‘blazon’, ‘coat of arms’ and ‘escutcheon’).
2) On flags as above, but the charge or charges displayed need not be heraldic in origin, and (and sometimes shown with weapons) is often said to symbolize a willingness to defend the country country (see also ‘French shield’, ‘Gothic shield’ with its following note, ‘Italian shield’, ‘rectangular shield’, ‘scalloped 2)’, ‘Spanish-style shield’ and the note below plus ‘triarched triangular shield’).

[shield shapes] [shield shapes] [shield shapes] [shield shapes] [shield shapes] [shield shapes]
Some Examples of Shield Shapes (CS)

[Kenya] [Kenya]
National Flag and National Arms of Kenya (fotw)

Please note that in English heraldry the shape of a shield is generally considered unimportant, however, on flags (and in some systems of continental heraldry) this shape may be exactly specified.

[Bosnian Podrinje] [Bosnian Podrinje]
Arms and Flag of Bosnian Podrinje, Bosnia and Herzegovina (Željko Heimer)


SHIELD-SHAPED
See ‘ogival’.

[shield-shaped flag]
Flag of France in a 14th Century image (Eugene Ipavec)


SHIELD OF DAVID
See ‘Magen David’.

Shield of David
Naval Ensign of Israel (fotw)


SHIFT COLOURS (or COLORS)
(v) In US, UK and some other naval usage, the procedure whereby a warship’s ensign is struck from its staff at the stern and hoisted at the peak as a vessel gets underway – see ‘peak 1)’ (also ‘gaff’, ‘ensign staff’, ‘naval ensign’ under ‘ensign’ and ‘strike’)

Please note that the practice began in the 18th Century due to a change in the design of the mizzen gaff-sail which made the fitting of an ensign staff impractical whilst underway.


SHIFTED TOWARDS
See ‘offset towards’.

Grande Comore
Flag of Grande Comore, Comoros (fotw)


SHIPPING (or SHIPPING COMPANY) HOUSE FLAG (or PENNANT)
See ‘house flag 1)’.

Shipping company flag
House Flag of Altaras, Caune & Cie, France (fotw)


SHIP’S CREST
In British Royal Navy usage and in some others, a traditional term for the badge of an individual warship – see ‘rope grommet’ (also ‘badge 3)’, ‘emblem, military and governmental/departmental’ and ‘military crest’).

HMS Warspite crest HMS Warspite crest
Badge/Ship’s Crest of HMS Warspite, Launched 1913 (Wikipedia); Badge/Ship’s crest HMS Sovereign (Wikipedia)


SHOULDER PATCH
See ‘flag patch’.

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