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Towson University (U.S.)


Last modified: 2010-08-13 by rick wyatt
Keywords: towson university | maryland | maryland normal school | university | united states |
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Description of the flag

Towson University is located in Towson Maryland, the county seat of Baltimore County. Towson University was founded in 1866 with the name Maryland Normal School. In 1935, it became known as Towson State Teacher's College and in 1963 became known as Towson State College. In 1976 it was granted University status and became known as Towson State University. By 1988 it became part of the University of Maryland system and on July 1, 1997 the name was again changed to Towson University.

There seem to be at least two flags for the University. At one sees a flag which is likely unofficial or possibly an alternate flag. At you see the university signature which is prominent on the flag I saw, with some exceptions. According to

The Towson University Brand Mark is the visual representation of Towson University and communicates the university's personality. Building on existing brand equity in the school colors of White, Gold and Black, the brand mark expresses the energetic image of Towson University. The use of two flags anchored in the word Towson ties the modern brand mark to the tradition of the flags in the formal university seal, and shows the aspirational attitude that differentiates.
Gold and black being the colors of the Calvert Arms, the differences I noted on the flag were:
  • There was no lettering on the flag.
  • The black "flag" in the logo was blue (B or B+).
  • The field of the flag was black.
  • The logotype/brand mark was throughout.
In addition, I seem to recall that the tiger head in the athletics brand mark may be on a flag as well (from a prior visit to the University). see, if so making the university have at least 3 flags, perhaps more. But that was a bad day for sightings.

Phil Nelson, 16 October 2005