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North Schleswig (Denmark)


Last modified: 2014-05-29 by zoltán horváth
Keywords: north schleswig | nordschleswig | denmark |
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[Flag for North Schleswig]  Chris Kretowicz, 18 May 2001

See also:

Use of the flag

North Schleswig refers to the German minority in Denmark (Sønderjylland).  The German-Danish border was set by the 1920 Plebiscite, resulting in a German population of about 20,000 in Denmark (6-8% of total population of Sønderjylland).  The capital is Apenrade.  It is part of the Euro-Region Sønderjylland/Schleswig, and enjoys broad cultural autonomy. Most of the time the German minority flies national colors of Germany on festive occasions, but, like the case with people just across the border, they too have distinctive flags of their own - as seen often at sporting events. That flag reflects the colors of their arms or emblem (or is it "logo"?).
Chris Kretowicz, 18 May 2001

Coat of arms

[Arms of North Schleswig] located by Chris Kretowicz, 18 May 2001

Bund deutscher Nordschleswiger

[Bund deutscher Nordschleswiger] located by Chris Kretowicz, 18 May 2001

The best source of information about everything North Schleswig is:  The political party of German population, which accomplished the most in fight for minority rights and cultural autonomy, Bund deutscher Nordshleswiger, used to fly white and blue flag with two lions in the
The other party. which dominates local politics now, Schleswiger Partei - SP - uses as its symbols salt and pepper shakers and it doesn't seems to be appropriated to be put on a flag.
Chris Kretowicz, 18 May 2001

BdN is not a party, but more of an umbrella organisation, encompassing schools, scouts, and other activities vital to keeping a minority culture alive, including a party.
Ole Andersen, 18 May 2001

History of Slesvig (Schleswig)

The Lords of Holstein got the Principat of Schleswig in 1386 from the Danish kings. The king of Denmark got both titles in personal union with Denmark after the last Lord of Holstein died in 1460. Since this time, Denmark tried to complete the unification, but officially this territories remained in the Holy Roman Empire of German Nations. At the time of the French revolution, Germans started to fight against the making Danish of this territories. In 1848 a German government was  constituted, supported by troops of the "Deutschen Bund", but Great Britain and Russia demanded to left S.-H. to Denmark. The troops left again this territories. In 1864, Prussian and Austrian troops conquered S.-H. . The dispute about its future caused the war between Prussia and Austria in 1866. S.-H. became a Prussian province. Northern Schleswig had to be given to Denmark in 1920 (caused by WW I), while southern Schleswig remains to Germany. Both parts of Schleswig have minorities of the other people with special rights. For example: The Danish minority in Germany has a guaranteed seat in Schleswig-Holstein parliament (Südschleswiger Wählerverband). Official HP of Schleswig-Holstein:

The Dannebrog is again in use by the Danish minority. While I was living in Flensburg in 1993, I saw it on several places, like Danish schools or churches. I didn't see another flag like it was reported here in past.
J. Patrick Fischer, 31 July 2001

I don't think they have a guaranteed seat, but because SSW is considered a national minority party, the general 5% treshold is waived, which has led to the party continuously having at least one member of the Landtag since 1947.
Ole Andersen, 31 July 2001