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RAAF Colours, Standards and Banners

Last modified: 2010-06-18 by jonathan dixon
Keywords: australia | air force | raaf | stars: southern cross | queens colour | squadron standard | wattle |
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Queen's Colour of the Royal Australian Air Force

{Queen's Colour of the RAAF] by Joe McMillan using images by Graeme Bartram, 23 November 2003

The Queen's Colour of the Royal Australian Air Force is a light blue silk flag, presumably 45 inches square, based on other Commonwealth air force colours, with the Union in the canton, the large seven-pointed Commonwealth star in the lower hoist, five white stars forming the Southern Cross in the upper fly, and the royal cipher in gold letters, ensigned with a St. Edward's crown in color, in the center. The edge of the field is embroidered with gold leaves, except where the Union canton is located. The fringe, cord, and tassels are silver and blue and the staff is surmounted by a gilt crown.
Joe McMillan, 25 January 2002

According to Chapter 12, Annex A of the RAAF Manual of Ceremonial, AAP 5135.002, which is downloadable at this Air Cadet Corps site, the light blue field is surrounded by a border of golden wattle sprigs (not including the area of the canton). Gold and crimson fringe, cord, and tassels. Although not stated in the manual, this flag is 45 inches square, as for the colour of the RAF in the UK. The finial is a gilt royal crest of England (lion statant guardant, royally crowned and standing upon a royal crown). The Queen's Colour is carried in a light blue colour belt edged with gold-black-gold lace, with the RAAF badge embroidered on it below the royal cipher.
Joe McMillan, 23 November 2003

I have found an excellent article about the Queen's Colour of the Royal Australian Air Force. The URL is: http://www.defence.gov.au/news/raafnews/editions/4308/story07.htm
Miles Li, 23 January 2002


Queen's Colours of a unit

The Queen's Colours For Schools (Air Force)is an air force blue flag, 45 inches square, with the badge of the school at the centre, and the crowned Royal cipher at the canton. Like the Queen's Colour for the RAAF, the whole flag is bordered by golden wattle branches, has a gold and sky blue fringe, cord and tassels, and army style crest.
Miles Li, 25 January 2002

Queen's Colour of a Unit - The one shown in the Chapter 12, Annex A of the RAAF Manual of Ceremonial, AAP 5135.002, which is downloadable at this Air Cadet Corps site, is for the School of Technical Training. It is light blue with a border of gold wattle sprigs all around, the royal cipher in upper hoist and the unit badge in the center. Same fringe, finial, etc., as for the Queen's Colour of the RAAF. Queen's Colours are granted to non-operational establishments or units with at least 25 years of service and only in extraordinary circumstances; they have been granted to only five organizations other than the RAAF itself.
Joe McMillan, 23 November 2003

The Queen's Colour is carried in a light blue colour belt like that for the Queen's Colour of the RAAF, with organizational badge in place of RAAF badge.
Joe McMillan, 14 October 2004


Squadron Standard

The Squadron Standard is for operational squadrons of the RAAF with more than 25 years service or combat distinction. It is as for other Commonwealth air forces, light blue silk, 32 x 48 inches, with the squadron badge in the center, flanked by up to eight small white scrolls inscribed with battle honors arrayed in two diagonal rows. If the standard displays an odd number of honors, one scroll is placed below the badge. The field of the flag is bordered by a wreath of roses, thistles, shamrocks, leeks, and wattle in full color. The pike is 8 feet 1 inch topped with a gilt eagle, its wings elevated. The fringe is gold and sky blue, as are the cord and tassels.
Joe McMillan, 25 January 2002

According to Chapter 12, Annex A of the RAAF Manual of Ceremonial, AAP 5135.002, which is downloadable at this Air Cadet Corps site, the field is bordered with embroidered depictions of the plant badges of the Australian states, the white scrolls edged red and inscribed with battle honors in black lettering. The standard illustrated in the manual is that of 77 Squadron and shows five honors on each side of the badge. Conditions for grant of a standard are the same as in the RAF--operational squadrons only, minimum of 25 years of service or especially distinguished achievement. Squadron standards are considered and treated as equivalent to regimental colours carried by battalions of the Australian Army.
Joe McMillan, 23 November 2003

The Squadron Standard is carried in a black belt with double rows of gold lace down the edges, with the squadron badge on the centre.
Joe McMillan, 14 October 2004

A squadron standard can be seen at http://www.defence.gov.au/raaf/organisation/info_on/units/24_sqn/about.htm.
Herman FMY, 11 May 2005


Governor-General's banner

The Governor General's Banner for the RAAF is for units ineligible for the Queen's Colour or Squadron Standard but having more than 25 years of distinguished service. I believe this one is unique to Australia. It is light blue silk, presumably 45 inches square, with a blue canton bearing the device from the Governor General's flag (the royal crest of England above a scroll bearing the name "Commonwealth of Australia"). In the center of the flag is the badge of the organization, surrounded by the five white stars from the national flag forming the Southern Cross, and in each corner, pointed inward, a spray of wattle in gold. Gold fringe; finial is a gold eagle with wings elevated; gold and blue cord and tassels. (Source http://www.defence.gov.au/raaf/1rtu/history.htm and http://www.defence.gov.au/raaf/avmed/governor.htm.)
Joe McMillan, 25 January 2002

The Governor-General's Banner is carried in a belt the same as that for Squadron Standards - black with double rows of gold lace down the edges, with the unit badge on the centre.
Joe McMillan, 14 October 2004

Example - Governor-General's Banner for No 1 Recruit Training Unit

[Governor-General's banner for No 1 Recruit Training Unit]
by Joe McMillan, using images by Mark Sensen and Željko Heimer, 25 January 2002